Why study music?

Music has a power of forming the character and should therefore be introduced into the education of the young.
—-Aristotle

Research shows that music students achieve better results in other academic subjects and are happier, healthier and enjoy more success in their chosen careers.

DID YOU KNOW? . . .

  • High school music students score higher on *SATs in both verbal and math than their peers. (*standardised test for university entrance in the U.S.)
  • University-age musicians are emotionally healthier than their non-musician counterparts.
  • A ten-year study, tracking more than 25,000 students, shows that music-making improves test scores.
  • Piano students are better equipped to comprehend mathematical and scientific concepts.
  • Music majors are the most likely group of university graduates to be admitted to medical school.
  • The world’s top academic countries place a high value on music education. Hungary, Netherlands and Japan stand atop worldwide science achievement and have strong commitment to music education.

Read more about each of these points (and their sources) at the NAMM Foundation

Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, and life to everything… Without music, life would be an error.
—-Plato

Read the article from the NY TimesIs Music the Key to Success?

High achievers like Alan Greenspan (former chair of the US Federal Reserve), Paul Allen (Microsoft co-founder) and Woody Allen (film director) say music sharpens essential skills like collaboration, creativity, discipline and the capacity to reconcile conflicting ideas; all qualities notably absent from public life… Multiple studies link music study to academic achievement. But what is it about serious music training that seems to correlate with outsize success in other fields?

Music lessons pay off in higher earningsRead the article from the NZ Herald

According to a 2007 survey, music students (especially singers) are well-placed to be financially successful in life. “88 per cent of people with a post-graduate education were involved in music while in school, and 83 per cent of people earning US$150,000 ($198,390) or more had a music education” . . . read more . . . >

Want smarter students? Enrol them in music lessons

“… Extensive overseas and local research suggests that children who learn a musical instrument, even for a relatively short period of time, show significant increases in intelligence & reasoning abilities, develop perseverence and flexibility of thought, are more sociable and better at working in teams, and even do better at maths . . .” . . . Listen to the Radio NZ podcast . . . >

Download Australia’s Music Education “Lobby Kit”

A guide for parents, teachers, principals and community members who are passionate about ensuring that music education is included in their school program, and need to act as advocates to build or develop programs in their area.

Music is a wonderful skill for any child, but new research shows how learning music can help your child in so many more ways:

  • Improved reasoning capacity and problem solving skills
  • Improve maths and language performance
  • Better memory
  • Greater social and team skills

For even more, visit The Benefits of Music Education at Music Education Online


MUSIC CHANGES OUR BRAINS . . .

Northwestern University scientists have pulled together a review of research into what music — specifically, learning to play music — does to humans. The result shows music training does far more than allow us to entertain ourselves and others by playing an instrument or singing. Instead, it actually changes our brains. . . read more . . . >


We need people who think with the creative side of their brains—people who have played in a band, who have painted…it enhances symbiotic thinking capabilities, not always thinking in the same paradigm, learning how to kick-start a new idea, or how to get a job done better, less expensively.
–—Annette Byrd, GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceuticals

CREATIVITY IS KEY TO EDUCATION . . .

As we move from the Industrial Age to the Information Age we need to prepare our students differently. Employers will increasing expect them to be flexible, innovative and most of all creative.

“Creativity now is as important in education as literacy and we should treat it with the same status.”
—-Sir Ken Robinson

Obama research calls for creativity to be put at heart of curriculum

In a foreword to the 18-month study, US education secretary Arne Duncan said the arts were “essential” to a complete education and claimed they led to better results in other subjects. (June 2011)


einstein violin
 
Imagination is more important than knowledge
—- Albert Einstein
 

UK ANNOUNCEs A NATIONAL PLAN FOR MUSIC EDUCATION

In November 2011 the UK announced a National Plan for music education. The report was titled "The importance of Music" and outlines the essential role that music education plays in every child's life:

“This National Plan is clear about the importance of music: it will ensure not just that more children have access to the greatest of art forms, but that they do better as a result in every other subject.”

UK Education Secretary Michael Gove announces review of music education

“Research shows that quality music education improves behaviour, attention and concentration, and has a hugely positive effect on numeracy and language skills. Giving all young people the best possible music education will help the Government achieve its twin aims of driving up standards and reducing the attainment gap.”

The Importance of Music – A National Plan for Music Education

“High quality music education enables lifelong participation in, and enjoyment of, music, as well as underpinning excellence and professionalism for those who choose not to pursue a career in music.”

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Music Teacher . Choral Conductor . Bass Voice Soloist . Choral Arranger

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